The attacks against foreigners are increasing in Morocco.

Jewish couple killed in Casablanca
The Moroccan government is trying to hide its notorious plight with terrorism to preserve the position of Morocco as a preferred destination for European tourists. The Moroccan authorities claimed the attacks were carried out by people affected by mental illness. However, these recursive attacks against tourists continue to multiply and it is increasingly clear that they are executed in the name of Islam. 

On October 4th 2016, a Dutch and two children on a visit to Casablanca were stabbed by a Moroccan while visiting the Hassan II Mosque. The video of the assault filmed by a witness went viral on social media networks imperiling the myth of Morocco as a holiday destination for European tourists. An assault that was met with total silence from the authorities, who not only imposed a blackout in the local press, but also begged discretion from Dutch consular authorities. Jewish couple murdered in Casablanca 

The same attitude of the Moroccan authorities was manifested in last August attack of five Italian owners of a circus parade when a Moroccan assailant killed one and four others were wounded. Again, the authorities hastily tried to minimize the political impact of this aggression by attributing the act to a "serial offender" and labeled the act as part of a "personal dispute" between the offender and the circus owners who had fired him from his job. 

On July 2nd 2016, Sam and Vicky Chetrit Toledano, a Jewish couple living in Casablanca, were murdered in their homes. In order to cover the tracks, the Moroccan authorities attributed the crime to their gardener. 

Last but not least, on September 26th 2016, three Spanish cyclists were attacked with an ax by a group of Moroccans in Nador, north of Morocco. Paradoxically, these bloody incidents haven't been described as a suspected case of "xenophobia" or, worse, an act of "terrorism" while they freshly carry all the ingredients of an act of xenophobia tinged in terrorism.